Peter Walker Photographer

Ratchapakdi Park, Hua Hin, Thailand
Magnificent bronze statues honouring seven great Kings of Thailand.

Entrance driveway to Ratchapakdi Park, containing the 13-meter-high bronze statues of seven great Kings of Thailand. Hua Hin, Petchaburi Province, Thailand, March 2016. Entrance driveway to Ratchapakdi Park, containing the 13-meter-high bronze statues of seven great Kings of Thailand. Hua Hin, Petchaburi Province, Thailand, March 2016.
Ratchapakdi Park, seven 13 meter high bronze statues of seven great Kings of Thailand. Hua Hin, Petchaburi Province, Thailand, March 2016. Ratchapakdi Park, seven 13 meter high bronze statues of seven great Kings of Thailand. Hua Hin, Petchaburi Province, Thailand, March 2016.
King Ram Khamhaeng (พ่อขุนรามคำแหง); c.1237/1247 – 1298, was the third king of the Phra Ruang dynasty, ruling the Sukhothai Kingdom (a forerunner of the modern kingdom of Thailand) from 1279–1298, during its most prosperous era. He is credited with the creation of the Thai alphabet and the firm establishment of Theravada Buddhism as the state religion of the kingdom. King Ram Khamhaeng (พ่อขุนรามคำแหง); c.1237/1247 – 1298, was the third king of the Phra Ruang dynasty, ruling the Sukhothai Kingdom (a forerunner of the modern kingdom of Thailand) from 1279–1298, during its most prosperous era. He is credited with the creation of the Thai alphabet and the firm establishment of Theravada Buddhism as the state religion of the kingdom.
King Naresuan (นเรศวร); 1555 –1605, was the King of the Ayutthaya Kingdom from 1590 until his death in 1605. Naresuan is one of Thailand's most revered monarchs as he was known for his campaigns to free Ayutthaya from the Bamars under the Taungoo Burma Dynasty. King Naresuan (นเรศวร); 1555 –1605, was the King of the Ayutthaya Kingdom from 1590 until his death in 1605. Naresuan is one of Thailand's most revered monarchs as he was known for his campaigns to free Ayutthaya from the Bamars under the Taungoo Burma Dynasty.
King Narai (นารายณ์); 1633 – 1688, was the king of Ayutthaya from 1656 to 1688 and arguably the most famous Ayutthayan king. His reign was the most prosperous during the Ayutthaya period and saw the great commercial and diplomatic activities with foreign nations including the Persians and Europe. King Narai (นารายณ์); 1633 – 1688, was the king of Ayutthaya from 1656 to 1688 and arguably the most famous Ayutthayan king. His reign was the most prosperous during the Ayutthaya period and saw the great commercial and diplomatic activities with foreign nations including the Persians and Europe.
King Taksin the Great (สมเด็จพระเจ้าตากสินมหาราช); 1734 – 1782, was a leader in the liberation of Siam from Burmese occupation after the second fall of Ayutthaya in 1767, and the subsequent unification of Siam after it fell under various warlords. He established the city of Thonburi, across the river from modern-day Bangkok, as the new capital of Siam. King Taksin the Great (สมเด็จพระเจ้าตากสินมหาราช); 1734 – 1782, was a leader in the liberation of Siam from Burmese occupation after the second fall of Ayutthaya in 1767, and the subsequent unification of Siam after it fell under various warlords. He established the city of Thonburi, across the river from modern-day Bangkok, as the new capital of Siam.
Phra Phutthayotfa Chulalok, Rama I: (พระพุทธยอดฟ้าจุฬาโลก); 1737 – 1809, was the founder and the first monarch of the reigning House of Chakri of Siam (now Thailand). He ascended the throne in 1782, after defeating a rebellion which had deposed King Taksin of Thonburi. He was also celebrated as the founder of Rattanakosin (now Bangkok) as the new capital of the reunited kingdom. Phra Phutthayotfa Chulalok, Rama I: (พระพุทธยอดฟ้าจุฬาโลก); 1737 – 1809, was the founder and the first monarch of the reigning House of Chakri of Siam (now Thailand). He ascended the throne in 1782, after defeating a rebellion which had deposed King Taksin of Thonburi. He was also celebrated as the founder of Rattanakosin (now Bangkok) as the new capital of the reunited kingdom.
King Mongkut, Rama IV: Phra Bat Somdet Phra Poramenthra Maha Mongkut Phra Chom Klao Chao Yu Hua (พระบาทสมเด็จพระปรเมนทรมหามงกุฎ พระจอมเกล้าเจ้าอยู่หัว); 1804 – 1868, was the fourth monarch of Siam (Thailand) under the House of Chakri, ruling from 1851 to 1868. During his reign, the pressure of Western expansionism was felt for the first time in Siam. Mongkut embraced Western innovations and initiated the modernisation of his country, both in technology and culture, earning him the epithet, The Father of Science and Technology in Siam. King Mongkut, Rama IV: Phra Bat Somdet Phra Poramenthra Maha Mongkut Phra Chom Klao Chao Yu Hua (พระบาทสมเด็จพระปรเมนทรมหามงกุฎ พระจอมเกล้าเจ้าอยู่หัว); 1804 – 1868, was the fourth monarch of Siam (Thailand) under the House of Chakri, ruling from 1851 to 1868. During his reign, the pressure of Western expansionism was felt for the first time in Siam. Mongkut embraced Western innovations and initiated the modernisation of his country, both in technology and culture, earning him the epithet, The Father of Science and Technology in Siam.
King Chulalongkorn, Rama V: Phra Bat Somdet Phra Poraminthra Maha Chulalongkorn Phra Chunla Chom Klao Chao Yu Hua (พระบาทสมเด็จพระปรมินทรมหาจุฬาลงกรณ์ พระจุลจอมเกล้าเจ้าอยู่หัว), 1853 – 1910, was the fifth monarch of Siam under the House of Chakri. His reign was characterised by the modernisation of Siam, government and social reforms, and territorial cessions to the British Empire and French Indochina. As Siam was threatened by Western expansionism, Chulalongkorn, through his policies and acts, managed to save Siam from being colonised. King Chulalongkorn, Rama V: Phra Bat Somdet Phra Poraminthra Maha Chulalongkorn Phra Chunla Chom Klao Chao Yu Hua (พระบาทสมเด็จพระปรมินทรมหาจุฬาลงกรณ์ พระจุลจอมเกล้าเจ้าอยู่หัว), 1853 – 1910, was the fifth monarch of Siam under the House of Chakri. His reign was characterised by the modernisation of Siam, government and social reforms, and territorial cessions to the British Empire and French Indochina. As Siam was threatened by Western expansionism, Chulalongkorn, through his policies and acts, managed to save Siam from being colonised.
Ratchapakdi Park, with its bronze statues of seven great Kings of Thailand, is a popular place to educate Thai students about their country's history. Hua Hin, Petchaburi Province, Thailand, March 2016. Ratchapakdi Park, with its bronze statues of seven great Kings of Thailand, is a popular place to educate Thai students about their country's history. Hua Hin, Petchaburi Province, Thailand, March 2016.